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  • "Plunge lines, talk to me!" said Terry Tibbs and I think he was right to initiate the discussion.


    I'm grinding a few bits of mild steel as practice for the main event and ma finding it difficult to get the plunge lines even, is there some sort of trick that makes this easier?


    Do you get it there or thereabouts until you've finished grinding the bevel and then go back and tidy it up or is the way to have some sort of stop on the blade and get it bang on from the first pass?


    All help gratefully recieved chaps and chappesses?

  • Good to see a fledgling maker not being afraid to ask questions such as this.
    Wonky plunge lines are the fixed blade equivalent of lock rock/blade play, i know that it doesn't affect the functioning of the knife, but it just looks pants :thumbdown:







    "This is my rifle.There are many like it, but this one is mine"


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Sharpen it like you love it, use it like you hate it.

  • - from what I've heard in discussions with makers here and abroad, most of it is practice........no real short cuts to constant perfect plunge lines.


    What you're doing, mate, is nothing short of brave and stunning and I congratulate you immensely :thumbsup:


    There are established makers I see who still don't have consistent and even plunge lines, so if you get close, to me, that'll be brilliant enough.


    You've a lot of excellent top help around you.......keep asking away :)

    ..


    ...anyone who rides a bike and loves nature, can never be poor, we will always be happy, no matter what
    Gunther Muller

  • I think adjectives like "fledgling maker" and "brave" are overstating the case somewhat bbut I thank you kindly for them anyway! :D


    I think the ceramic belts ought to help with cutting clean lines, I have been practising freehand grinding on an old file I stuck in the over and tempered to dark straw and it just laughs at the AO belts.


    I also realised, watching videos on youtube that I am grinding with the blade the wrong way around, i.e. edge down on the grinder and it's making it harder to be consistent.


    I am enjoying making things with my own hands very much, I'm pretending to be any good at this stuff but it's fun trying.


    @TrayTray talent at design helps immensely, It must be said.

  • If I can give an advice that would be... don't rush it! I have spoiled enough blades to know and I'm still messing some up.
    One wrong final pass just because my daughter was calling and I wanted to finish the blade.
    One wrong move sometimes just can't fixed.
    Of course, a messed or not blade is always judged by where you're aiming.
    As said, many have made careers without making one symmetrical knife...

  • As Paul said, some makers who charge many many dinar still don't get them symmetrical (or even anywhere near close, sometimes), so I guess it's pretty damn challenging!


    What sort of plunge are you going for? If you're looking straight down onto the blade edge, some go for a T (e.g. most Spyderco folders) and others go for a V, or somewhere between the two.

    As long as they end up even I shall call the results the intention all along! :D


    I think a nice V with radiused plunge lines would be the ideal but a nice even T might be easier?

  • If I can give an advice that would be... don't rush it! I have spoiled enough blades to know and I'm still messing some up.
    One wrong final pass just because my daughter was calling and I wanted to finish the blade.
    One wrong move sometimes just can't fixed.
    Of course, a messed or not blade is always judged by where you're aiming.
    As said, many have made careers without making one symmetrical knife...

    Thanks buddy, I shall just have to be extra careful I suppose. :)

  • No idea what's easier! I've seen the T plunge criticised because of the abrupt angles and thus stress risers, but I prefer how they look and sharpen when compared to the gradual V which - for me - wastes cutting edge.


    I'm also keen on sharpening choils, but for game prep they don't seem preferred due to the catching potential. Again, not sure whether having one or not is harder/easier.

  • No idea what's easier! I've seen the T plunge criticised because of the abrupt angles and thus stress risers, but I prefer how they look and sharpen when compared to the gradual V which - for me - wastes cutting edge.


    I'm also keen on sharpening choils, but for game prep they don't seem preferred due to the catching potential. Again, not sure whether having one or not is harder/easier.

    Sharpening choils do make sharpening much easier and they eliminate that unsightly mode of edge wear where the knife ends up looking like a butcher's filleting knife but looking at my meagre collection of customs, none of them have one! :D


    It can hang up I suppose but not if you are using a knife properly IMO, a little wiggle would set them free.


    I am opposed to them on remate or coup de grace knives as after sticking a beast you do need to pull the knife out in a hurry or be slashed across the wrist or forearm by tusks or antlers.