Canada competes with UK over "Most ridiculous knife laws"

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  • I remembered a few years ago, a doctor called for kitchen knives to limited in length and have no pointy tip. So, don't joke with that, THEY would have no qualm banning kitchen knives longer than X cm unless without a point. Not as if they cook for themselves that much. Half the people are just eating out McDonalds or some take-away, so they don't need kitchen knives either. Chefs would have to show their employer liability insurance to prove they have good reason to own a kitchen knife (same as for movie companies or re-enactors defense to get black airsofts). And foodies would have to apply for a kitchen knife certificate (valid 5 years, safe required, up to 8 slots on KKC, wooden spoons are exempt). And don't get me started on forks.

  • I remembered a few years ago, a doctor called for kitchen knives to limited in length and have no pointy tip. So, don't joke with that, THEY would have no qualm banning kitchen knives longer than X cm unless without a point. Not as if they cook for themselves that much. Half the people are just eating out McDonalds or some take-away, so they don't need kitchen knives either. Chefs would have to show their employer liability insurance to prove they have good reason to own a kitchen knife (same as for movie companies or re-enactors defense to get black airsofts). And foodies would have to apply for a kitchen knife certificate (valid 5 years, safe required, up to 8 slots on KKC, wooden spoons are exempt). And don't get me started on forks.


    Edward de Bono has said that intelligent people are some of the worst critical thinkers, due to their ability to justify their point of view. Apparently some politicians are very well educated also, so the point does indeed seem to have validity...

  • The legislation is absurd for a few reasons. One is that you can import as many huge Bowie knives as you like, but something like a CRKT No. 5, Spyderco UKPK, or even a lot of small friction folders would be completely illegal to import (and presumably therefore purchase) because it's openable with one hand. These knives aren't the ones used in crimes, but they'll be banned because for some reason the concept of a 3 inch "flick knife" is more concerning than a 10 inch Bowie, or kitchen knife for that matter. That point is only compounded by the fact that a vast majority of knife crime relies on fixed bladed kitchen knives. It's a ban that hurts the law abiding citizens whilst doing nothing to stop the criminals. That's another issue with this kind of lawmaking.

    The other issue is that it relies on the skill and dexterity of the enforcer. Under this, plenty of knives would become flick knives because so many knives can be opened by holding the blade and swinging the handle out by flicking the wrist. This puts every 'plier based' multitool in jeopardy, because the handles are so heavy. The only friction folders I haven't been able to do this with have been Opinels, which have very light wooden handles. Buck 110? Banned. Higonokami? Banned. Heck, even those lockback utility knives with the disposable blades would be banned. Kinda ridiculous to me.


    From my knife drawer, I would estimate that less than a third of them can be opened like that...


    But that's your knife drawer, and yours alone. Surely you can see that you can't use that to represent all of cutlery collecting. Even so, what the proposed legislation would mean for you is that you couldn't purchase up to one third of your current, perfectly legal collection. To me that seems like a big deal. My losses would be even less than yours, I assure you, but that doesn't make the legislation OK. It doesn't affect me, I'm not Canadian, but it's this kind of thing that needs to be stamped on before it gets too far out of hand.


    It's worth bearing in mind that, in North America especially, there are far fewer 'traditional' slipjoint knives because the carry laws are different there, so this will have a larger impact there than here in the UK. So much of current knife innovation is in flippers and the like, and North America is one of the hubs of this development. If this law were introduced in other countries it would be catastrophic for the whole industry.