Real Steel Bushcraft folder

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    • Jimmypie wrote:

      @Coopster you should start a bushcraft for noobs thread :)

      I don't know if you're implying that:

      A) what I'm saying is worth talking about and deserves its own thread

      B) stop waffling, I'm hijacking the thread

      C) I'm talking to other members like noobs and should probably check myself as I have no idea re their experience level

      D) what I'm saying indicates I'm a bushcraft noob myself

      In any case I think you're right Jim :D

      I'll stop hijacking now, apologies.
      A good sharp edge is a man's best hedge against the vague uncertainties of life - Corb Lund
    • Thanks for the info guys, I havent read the passaround thread yet but I shall have a gander.

      I only ask because having hurt myself wth a framelock doing things that were not particularly wise, but I thought the knife was rock solid .. . . . I particularly wondered about battoning and other applications that place reverse loads on the lock and generally high stress applicaitons. Is the liner lock sturdy enough. I am tempted to pick one of these up, thus my curiosity.
      "Do or Do not, There is No Try" - Yoda
    • Yossarian wrote:

      Thanks for the info guys, I havent read the passaround thread yet but I shall have a gander.

      I only ask because having hurt myself wth a framelock doing things that were not particularly wise, but I thought the knife was rock solid .. . . . I particularly wondered about battoning and other applications that place reverse loads on the lock and generally high stress applicaitons. Is the liner lock sturdy enough. I am tempted to pick one of these up, thus my curiosity.
      The knife/linerlock is robust enough for light-medium battoning tasks IMO,, but the removal of the double thumbstuds (as in Jim's photos) would be of benefit, as they would be a hinderance here.
    • Hi @Yossarian,

      I've done heavy batoning with almost every type of locking mechanism on a quest to answer the same question your asking. My recommendation, use a fixed blade.

      I've broken/badly damaged liner, frame, back, axis, compression and collar locks trying to baton folders and that's in normal batoning use, nothing overly extreme.

      I've had "zero damage" failures on both axis and compression locks too, where the vibration of batoning has caused the lock to slip, allowing the knife to fold without damaging the lock.

      The only lock I've not managed to damage yet is the Tri-ad lock on the Cold Steel Finn Wolf. I have batoned it though some really knarley stuff, zero damage, solid as a rock. I ended up buying three of them as I was so impressed with the lock. Still my go-to light hiking knife.

      Still why take the risk? I carry a fixed blade whenever I can, and sometimes when I can't :D
      A good sharp edge is a man's best hedge against the vague uncertainties of life - Corb Lund

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Coopster: Because he's illiterate. ().

    • I also rate the tri ad lock ,I'd like to put the mjr pits lock to the test as it physically looks impossible to give out once locked up no weak link areas apart from the user . BUT it's my fav open n closer at the moment it sounds just like its built precision engineering , the real steel punches above its price tag but as already stated plenty of fixed blades at that price range that should be used for those tasks nothing worse than trying not to panic a few miles out with a finger hanging off and half a white tee shirt wrapped around it (looking like bolting paper) with a compass and a map in the other hand and the sun going down and a torch in the teeth ...........I'll dig the pics out
      I NEED A SHAVE archaeologist-squared
    • Agreed. I've done myself some notable damage in the middle of nowhere on various occasions. First item on the list when building a bushcraft kit... First aid.

      I've tried to light tinder with blood running down my hands and its not easy.

      Worst I ever saw was a guy with a hultafors agdor axe glance off the log he was aiming for and burying the axe head around an inch in his leg. Moral of the story, safe techniques are the key to a good day out.
      A good sharp edge is a man's best hedge against the vague uncertainties of life - Corb Lund