Vintage Puma Knives

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    • Some time ago i scored this vintage 4-liner Puma 959 hunting folder made in 1986.
      Still brand spanking new in original yellow/green box and complete with soft leather pouch & papers.
      Never worn, used, or sharpened and always kept inside the box.
      Inlayed in the front sambar stag panel is a real silver shield where the buyer could have his initials engraved.




















    • kwakster wrote:

      Some time ago i scored this vintage 4-liner Puma 959 hunting folder made in 1986.
      Still brand spanking new in original yellow/green box and complete with soft leather pouch & papers.
      Never worn, used, or sharpened and always kept inside the box.
      Inlayed in the front sambar stag panel is a real silver shield where the buyer could have his initials engraved.



      Super knife with brilliant stag. Great find! :)
    • Managed to score a 6377 White Hunter in good condition, the version with the hard chromed Pumaster steel blade.
      The sheath was quite dry, so i cleaned it and applied a good quality wax.
      The leather strings fell apart, so i'm in the process of making new ones.















      Pic from the net:



      Specs:

      Overall length: 10.67 inch (27,1 cm)
      Blade length: 5.98 inch (15,2 cm)
      Blade thickness (ricasso): 5,71 mm
      Steel: Pumaster Steel (hard chromed Böhler NWN80 carbon steel)
      Handle material: Sambar stag with aluminum guard
      Weight: 263 gram
      Sheath: Leather
      Made in 1976
    • Great catch Kwakster it looks a beauty. I need to learn more about the different steels they used, I don't know enough.
      My grail Puma was always a Waidblatt, a couple of weeks ago I managed to get this one from Germany to match my nicker, which would have been part of the Waidbesteck set. Just took a quick photo, to show it off. Will do a proper photo set soon as it came in the sheath and presentation box with the papers etc. I'm well chuffed, old school is cool.

    • Hi, Kwakster, thanks very much for taking the trouble to photo and paste your great collection. Very jealous.

      As a kid, my Uncle had what I remember as a 6377 White Hunter. I seem to remember it as having a Red plastic handle.
      It certainly wasn't the Fillet model as we were using it to pry Paua (abalone) the size of dinner plates off rocks.

      Am I correct in thinking this was a white hunter? Were they made with Plastic handles?

      I could not afford to buy one when younger. However did manage to get their folder with black plastic handles (fell off!) and recently a used White Hunter in stag.
      I did manage to get a Skinner, but sold it (way too cheap) at a gun show. Just didn't seem practical to me even though I was doing a lot of Culling on Deer, Goats, Possums and Rabbits at time. Just not versatile enough for my use.

      White Hunter is VERY practical knife to use actually. I like it a lot. Seems to do most things in the bush well, other than have a fine tip for detailed work. The balance with weight at tip is a plus for Jungle work though. Cuts far above it's size with heavy tip. Apparently the fine serrations at Choil are for notching bone, to enable it to then be cracked with Spine. Also the unsharpened Spine (false edge) can be used for bark removal and cracking smaller branches, therefore saving the sharp edge. The Designer obviously was a experienced User of Knives.
      In short, a well thought out up to date design.

      Puts a lot of more modern computer designs to shame..
    • That 959 is divine. Really is a work of art.
      It appears to me, after a close look at your excellent photos, that when finished, some sort of black glue type substance has been applied to the Antler.
      It is most obvious when looking at the Brass pins. It can be seen partially covering one pin and on another it can be seen as a circle around one side.
      I always suspected this, but first time evidence. Not a issue, just unusual to see the black dirt/oxidisation that deep on natural antler.
      I am jealous.
      Have never seen one in N.Z. (# 959) Maybe they were not exported to here in the past?
    • kiwicut wrote:

      Hi, Kwakster, thanks very much for taking the trouble to photo and paste your great collection. Very jealous.

      Well, my collection is actually very modest at best compared to this truly magnificent one here: pumahunter.de/
      If anyone anywhere in the world has a more extensive collection of vintage Puma models in fantastic condition i'm not aware of it anyway.



      As a kid, my Uncle had what I remember as a 6377 White Hunter. I seem to remember it as having a Red plastic handle.
      It certainly wasn't the Fillet model as we were using it to pry Paua (abalone) the size of dinner plates off rocks.

      Am I correct in thinking this was a white hunter? Were they made with Plastic handles?


      I don't remember that the 6377 White Hunter was ever produced with a red plastic handle, but maybe your uncle had a Seahunter model, as that would explain the red (rubber) handle.

      I could not afford to buy one when younger. However did manage to get their folder with black plastic handles (fell off!) and recently a used White Hunter in stag.
      I did manage to get a Skinner, but sold it (way too cheap) at a gun show. Just didn't seem practical to me even though I was doing a lot of Culling on Deer, Goats, Possums and Rabbits at time. Just not versatile enough for my use.


      I sharpen quite a lot of vintage Puma knives for hunters in my area, and most of the models i see on a regular basis are the old school smaller fixed blades designed by Walter Frevert a.o: 3587 small Jagdnicker, 3589 big Jagdnicker, 6398 Hunter's Friend, 6397 Hunter's Pal, 6393 Skinner, as well as the hunting folders 941, 942, 943, 944,945, 959.
      The single blade folders with the black plastic handles were cheaper versions of the same models with green plastic handles & Super Keen Cutting Steel blades, and it could be that some corners were cut in production.


      White Hunter is VERY practical knife to use actually. I like it a lot. Seems to do most things in the bush well, other than have a fine tip for detailed work. The balance with weight at tip is a plus for Jungle work though. Cuts far above it's size with heavy tip. Apparently the fine serrations at Choil are for notching bone, to enable it to then be cracked with Spine. Also the unsharpened Spine (false edge) can be used for bark removal and cracking smaller branches, therefore saving the sharp edge. The Designer obviously was a experienced User of Knives.
      In short, a well thought out up to date design.


      I tend to agree with you for the most part, but it very much depends on who you ask (as with many things)
      An aspect that many found to be problematic with the White Hunter was (and is) resharpening due to the changing grind & thickness along the main edge, and also because these knives were hand made they could vary quite a bit in how straight the blade was and if grinds on both sides were symmetric or a bit off.
      On many of these you can forget sharpening them with a Wicked Edge or Edge Pro, best to do them freehand on bench stones (or Paper/Rubber Wheels)
      A few hunters i know still carry & use them as a jack of all trades, not so much as an actual hunting knife.
      They do however seem to do a good job for stabbing/mercy kills, as the wide point tends to glance off of bones into the softer tissues while the broad front end of the blade produces a rather large wound channel leading to more loss of blood and a quicker death.


      Puts a lot of more modern computer designs to shame..


      Completely agree.
      Many of these old school designs have stood the test of time & real world use, especially the ones designed by Oberforstmeister Walter Frevert.
      The man definitely knew what he was doing.

    • Vintage Puma Scout knife from the '50's, and apart from a few details comparable to the well known Hitler Youth knife.














      Specs:

      Overall length: 24,4 cm (9.6 inches)
      Blade length: 13,9 cm (5.47 inches)
      Blade thickness: max. 6,14 mm (ricasso)
      Steel: hot drop-forged carbon steel
      Hardness: 60+ HRC (estimate based on sharpening)
      Handle material: Chromed metal with riveted Bakelite grips & Fleur de Lis emblem
      Sheath: metal with 2 steel clamp springs inside & a leather belt loop
      Weight of the knife without sheath: 213 grams
      Weight of the knife with sheath: 287 grams
    • Vintage Puma 3589 Jagdnicker from 1977.
      The model was designed by German Oberforstmeister (Chief Forester) Walter Frevert in the '50's of the previous century, en to this day it's highly regarded by hunters because of it's efficient design handcrafted from high quality materials.

      "Abnicken" is the German word for a certain method of providing the coup de grace, in this case to wounded deer.
      To perform this act the hunter bends down the head of the deer with one hand, and then stabs the knife precisely between the skull and the first vertebra with his other hand.
      This severs the spinal cord which ends the life of the deer quickly and as painless as possible. (also see the last picture which describes this method in German).
      For this specific purpose the Jagdnicker has a very sharp & swedged point which at the same time is relatively wide, and also placed outside of the centerline of the blade.
      Due to this design the point has a strong tendency to glance off of bones and into the soft tissues, much better than a symmetric hunting dagger blade.
      The 3589 Jagdnicker is further used as a strong allround hunting knife that seems to appeal to both hunters & collectors alike.



















      Specs:

      Overall length: 9.2 inches (23.4 cm)
      Blade length: 4.72 inches (12.0 cm)
      Max blade thickness: 5,3 mm
      Steel: stainless
      Hardness: 59-60 HRC (estimate based on sharpening)
      Handle materials: Sambar stag panels, solid nickel silver bolsters & a silver medaillon (for the owner's initials)
      Sheath (new): Leather

      The post was edited 1 time, last by kwakster ().

    • Puma 6310 Sportmesser (sporting knife) from around 1940.
      Although the model number is in the 1940 Puma catalogue, it shows only the 4.5 " version, not this 6" bladed version.













      Specs:

      Overall length: 10.12 inch (25,7 cm)
      Blade length: 5.98 inch (15,2 cm)
      Max. blade thickness: 4,51 mm (ricasso)
      Steel: hot drop-forged carbon steel
      Handle material: leather and brass washers + guard & aluminum pommel
      Sadly without a sheath.